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  • How to Increase Tunisian Crochet Stitch Blocks

    November 7th, 2014 by Vashti Braha

    Today’s post is about how to increase tunisian crochet at those tricky row ends!

    These are winning methods because they don’t limit how many stitches you can increase at a time. (Please see issue #64 of my newsletter for more). This means I can smoothly add big lacy spaces and whole blocks of solid stitch repeats where I wish in Tunisian crochet. This is something I’ve always loved about regular crochet.

    Method #1. How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Half Hitch method

    How to increase Tunisian crochet: the Half Hitch Method
    A half hitch is simply a loop with a twist in it.

    The simple little loop shown in this first photo is used to crochet limpets. It’s best known as the simple/single/backwards loop cast on in knitting. It’s also used in tatting and in macramé. This video* shows half hitches being added to a knitting. This is how I do it and I’ve really picked up speed.
    *Scroll past the first one (“Long-Tail Cast-On”) to the one called “Single Cast-On Also Known As Backward-Loop Cast-On.”

    In my original 2009 blog post about this method I use a pair of them as a double half hitch (dhh). Any number of half hitches can also be used singly for shaping Tunisian crochet.

    Method #2. How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Tunisian Foundation Slip Stitch method

    How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Tfslst Method

    Feel free to choose a loop other than the tinted ones shown. These are the fastest ones for me.

    At the end of your Forward Pass, insert hook in one side loop of the end stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop. Then chain the number of stitches you wish to add. I chained four in this second photo. Then take the last loop off of your hook; your stitches should resemble those in the photo.

    Then, insert your hook under one loop of the first chain (tinted pink) and leave on your hook. Repeat with each remaining chain; then put the live loop back on your hook, as described in the caption.

    I found this Tfslst method after I designed the Five Peaks Shawl with half hitch increases. I used Tfslsts in the Four Peaks Scarf pattern, and most recently in the Warm Aeroette Scarf.

    I love having both of these methods to choose from, depending on the project.

    They are probably interchangeable enough that you could use the one you prefer. (More on that in the newsletter.)

    The most important thing is to choose a method that doesn’t impose a limit!

    Often when someone asks in a forum how to increase Tunisian crochet stitches, the advice is to squeeze them in. Typically this means adding a stitch in another loop just behind or next to another stitch. This method is fine if you’re replacing a stitch that you accidentally decreased in an earlier row. If you think of basic Tunisian crochet fabric as a grid, space was already reserved for the missing stitch, and you’re just filling it back in.

    How to increase Tunisian crochet steadily at the edges a better way
    Effect of the “squeeze-it-in” method shows in the left swatch. Not recommended for something like a shawl.

    The Squeeze-it-in: my least favorite shaping method.

    The Squeeze-it-in method has limits. It’s okay for just a rare stitch here and there, and away from the edges. In other words, as an “internal” shaping method. I don’t mean to impose rigid rules. Depending on the project, yarn type, and hook size, squeezing in new stitches whenever you wish may come out fine.

    For me, this shaping method often interferes with my goal of a languid, swaying drape for Tunisian crochet accessories. When I consider how to increase Tunisian crochet edges for a new design, Squeeze-me-in is last on my list.

    Share





    2 responses to “How to Increase Tunisian Crochet Stitch Blocks”

    1. Linda Dean says:

      Love it! Always so many ways to tackle a problem, and it’s fun to see what each affect is created.
      I love the half-hitch, my daughter was teaching me to use it as a knitting cast on.

      • Vashti says:

        Hi Linda! I grew up so accustomed to apparent limits in Tunisian crochet that I was glad to have just one way to do unlimited increasing. It’s exciting to keep discovering more!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    How to Increase Tunisian Crochet Stitch Blocks

    November 7th, 2014 by Vashti Braha

    Today’s post is about how to increase tunisian crochet at those tricky row ends!

    These are winning methods because they don’t limit how many stitches you can increase at a time. (Please see issue #64 of my newsletter for more). This means I can smoothly add big lacy spaces and whole blocks of solid stitch repeats where I wish in Tunisian crochet. This is something I’ve always loved about regular crochet.

    Method #1. How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Half Hitch method

    How to increase Tunisian crochet: the Half Hitch Method
    A half hitch is simply a loop with a twist in it.

    The simple little loop shown in this first photo is used to crochet limpets. It’s best known as the simple/single/backwards loop cast on in knitting. It’s also used in tatting and in macramé. This video* shows half hitches being added to a knitting. This is how I do it and I’ve really picked up speed.
    *Scroll past the first one (“Long-Tail Cast-On”) to the one called “Single Cast-On Also Known As Backward-Loop Cast-On.”

    In my original 2009 blog post about this method I use a pair of them as a double half hitch (dhh). Any number of half hitches can also be used singly for shaping Tunisian crochet.

    Method #2. How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Tunisian Foundation Slip Stitch method

    How to increase Tunisian crochet stitches with the Tfslst Method

    Feel free to choose a loop other than the tinted ones shown. These are the fastest ones for me.

    At the end of your Forward Pass, insert hook in one side loop of the end stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop. Then chain the number of stitches you wish to add. I chained four in this second photo. Then take the last loop off of your hook; your stitches should resemble those in the photo.

    Then, insert your hook under one loop of the first chain (tinted pink) and leave on your hook. Repeat with each remaining chain; then put the live loop back on your hook, as described in the caption.

    I found this Tfslst method after I designed the Five Peaks Shawl with half hitch increases. I used Tfslsts in the Four Peaks Scarf pattern, and most recently in the Warm Aeroette Scarf.

    I love having both of these methods to choose from, depending on the project.

    They are probably interchangeable enough that you could use the one you prefer. (More on that in the newsletter.)

    The most important thing is to choose a method that doesn’t impose a limit!

    Often when someone asks in a forum how to increase Tunisian crochet stitches, the advice is to squeeze them in. Typically this means adding a stitch in another loop just behind or next to another stitch. This method is fine if you’re replacing a stitch that you accidentally decreased in an earlier row. If you think of basic Tunisian crochet fabric as a grid, space was already reserved for the missing stitch, and you’re just filling it back in.

    How to increase Tunisian crochet steadily at the edges a better way
    Effect of the “squeeze-it-in” method shows in the left swatch. Not recommended for something like a shawl.

    The Squeeze-it-in: my least favorite shaping method.

    The Squeeze-it-in method has limits. It’s okay for just a rare stitch here and there, and away from the edges. In other words, as an “internal” shaping method. I don’t mean to impose rigid rules. Depending on the project, yarn type, and hook size, squeezing in new stitches whenever you wish may come out fine.

    For me, this shaping method often interferes with my goal of a languid, swaying drape for Tunisian crochet accessories. When I consider how to increase Tunisian crochet edges for a new design, Squeeze-me-in is last on my list.

    Share





    2 responses to “How to Increase Tunisian Crochet Stitch Blocks”

    1. Linda Dean says:

      Love it! Always so many ways to tackle a problem, and it’s fun to see what each affect is created.
      I love the half-hitch, my daughter was teaching me to use it as a knitting cast on.

      • Vashti says:

        Hi Linda! I grew up so accustomed to apparent limits in Tunisian crochet that I was glad to have just one way to do unlimited increasing. It’s exciting to keep discovering more!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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