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  • Picot Crochet Card Edge (Free Pattern)


    The other day I posted a photo of a freeform crochet card edge I did over four years ago. I found the photo by accident while looking for something else. In that post I described how to crochet it, to the best of my memory. Back then I mailed off the card right away. I have no memory of having written down any how-to info.

    Well, I just now I found the notes to myself about it. By accident again! (I’ve been going through lots of old files, boxes, CD roms, etc. so I’m finding all kinds of things.)

    Below I’ve typed in everything from that paper to be readable. I suppose you could say this is a…

    Free Pattern for a Picot Crochet Card Edge

     

    Supplies Needed:

    • Size #7 Boye steel crochet hook (or size that will pull the thread you’re using through the holes punched in the card).
    • Size #10 cotton crochet thread: Coats Opera (100% mercerized cotton, 230m per 50g ball), 2 colors.
    • Greeting card: the thicker the card stock, the better. Glossy card stock is even stronger.
    • Single hole paper punch: 1/16″ diameter holes. (Look for one in the scrapbooking section of a craft store.)

    Stitches and Abbreviations Used:

    • ch = chain
    • sc = single crochet
    • sl st = slip stitch
    • st(s) = stitch(es)

    Begin Picot Petals Crochet Card Edge (“Crochet Embellishment of Gloria’s sympathy Card, February 24, 2010”)

    Step One: I punched holes fairly randomly. Sometimes I filled in with additional holes later.

    Step Two: With pink thread for flower petals, *ch 6 or 7, sl st in the 6th or 7th ch from your crochet hook, sc in the same or next hole, depending. (Depending on how it looks and how far away the next hole is. Bunching them here and there brings out the petal look.) Repeat from the *, or just sc again in a hole; add a ch or two to adjust the tension of the sts as you edge the card.

    Step Three: With green thread for leaves, ch 6 or 7, sl st in 4th or 5th ch from your hook. Space these out a bit more than the petals were. I spaced them with only just enough chs to sc in the next hole gracefully.


    I ended the pattern notes with, “I like how the bunched pink petals look next to the more spread out green sts.”

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    • November 21st, 2014 by Vashti Braha

    The Two Free Victorian Crochet Pattern Books I Love!


    Of course, ALL free Victorian crochet pattern books are lovable. After I researched crochet stitches for my classes, though, I keep these two close by and bookmarked. Both of these antique crochet books were published in 1891. (Click each image for the free download information and link.)

    Last year I searched in literally hundreds of crochet books and booklets. I love researching crochet. Lots of antique, public domain crochet sources are keepers. Perhaps these two stand out in particular because of the specific stitches I was looking for.

    • The Art of Crocheting. By Butterick Publishing Co., Ltd., 1891 (London and New York).
    • Home Work, A Choice Collection of Useful Designs for the Crochet and Knitting Needle… By A. M., Rose Publishing Co. Ltd. (Toronto).

    I recorded all occurrences of star stitches, love knots (“knot stitches” to the Victorians), and lacy Tunisian crochet patterns. I was surprised to discover that in many of the publications ranging from the 1840’s to the 2010’s, these stitches often didn’t appear at all. These two 1891 gems were especially fun for creative star stitch patterns.

    Researching crochet stitches in free Victorian crochet pattern books offers lots of insight into crochet’s development. It’s fascinating to see how crochet is explained, illustrated, and promoted. Exciting, too! By 1891 the public demand for crochet patterns and stitch how-tos was very strong.

    Free Victorian crochet pattern books date from the 1840’s to shortly before World War I. Please support the Antique Pattern Library. It’s one of my favorite sources for some obscure early indie crochet designer booklets too. I hope you will help their cause by donating scans or funds.

    The Home Work book was the focus of an ambitious crochet pattern project by the Cyber Chapter of the Crochet Guild of America (CGOA). Members crocheted actual swatches and projects from the book. The exhibit of them at CGOA’s annual Chain Link conference was a highlight of the event!

    Also see my Antique Crochet Stunners board in Pinterest.

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    • October 18th, 2014 by Vashti Braha

    I Fixed Adjustable Straps of a Bra Top with Crochet


    This easy crochet fix for adjustable straps wins a five year test.

    The adjustable straps of my bra tops usually loosen. They should just stay where I put them! Some of these straps are slippery or satiny. My thinking was to use crochet to add more friction to the strap, but still be adjustable when and if I choose. Can I have it my way? The answer turns out to be YES!

    I took the first two photos in December 2008 – over five years ago. (I thought I might want to blog about it.) These were a few hurried shots with my new camera, while also making Christmas and Hanukkah gifts. In the holiday rush I forgot about the photos until…yesterday. Meanwhile, I wore this hard working garment almost daily for about five years.

    After these three photos (click each to enlarge and see more info) I list the steps of how I did this fix.

    The simple steps I took to improve these adjustable straps with crochet:

    I chose a size #10 cotton crochet thread in a matching color. In this case, a light blue Coats Opera thread. You can see it in this photo.

    With a #7 steel crochet hook, I chained about 50 and then fastened off.

    Applied a layer of any fabric glue to the relevant area of the strap. Before it dried I arranged the crochet chain in the wavy pattern you see here. Note: it stays in place best if the bottom of the chain stitches is facing up. The top loops of the chains form the flattest side of the chain. So if you look closely at these strap photos, you might see that you’re looking at the “bump” loops of the chain stitches (At this blog it’s called the “back ridge.”)

    When dry enough, I sewed along each edge of the strap with the zigzag setting of my sewing machine. Using the glue first made this step super quick and low-stress. That’s it!

    The zigzag stitch is very important. You need to include flex in your stitches because the straps need to retain their elastic range. Otherwise you risk breaking the sewing thread during wear.

    This is another benefit of using crochet chains. The crochet stitches build in just a bit of flex, especially when arranged the way they are here.

    I’m 100% pleased with this diy crochet fix. I would do this again with the adjustable straps of my other tops. (Did you notice the paws of my kitten in the first photo? I didn’t until today.)

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    • October 6th, 2014 by Vashti Braha


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