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  • Steek Crochet With Pattern Schematics in Any Language


    Pattern schematics inspire me to steek crochet.

    I wish every crochet garment pattern offered a schematic. It outlines the sections of a garment, like puzzle pieces. Schematics cut through illusions cast by fashion photography and lovely models. A single pattern schematic can distill a fancy design to its simplest essence. I created two Pinterest boards of things that inspire me to steek crochet: Steeks: Ideas and Wearable Simple Shapes.

    Schematics also cut through language barriers. I can understand a non-English pattern if it includes a schematic.

    I created a few sample schematics for the Tunisian steek crochet class handout and realized how much I get out of them. This would be the next newsletter issue if I had time to do one! (Too much conference prep.)

    Steek crochet using pattern schematics from around the 'net

    Some simple squares and rectangles from my Tunisian class handout. Add a steek where you see a pink bar, fold on the dotted line, et voilà!—instant garment.

    A schematic is sensational to me when a garment that looks chic on a model, yet its schematic reveals that it’s made of simple shapes, such as rectangles. This is exciting because every crocheter or knitter first learns how to make rectangles, right?

    Sometimes all you need is a rectangle that drapes, or is clingy/stretchy (or all of these). Sometimes weightlessness brings it home, other times it’s a luxuriously weighty swing. The schematic tells you what’s what when you know what to look for.

    Sometimes the key to chic is a well-placed seam on a simple shape. Sometimes it’s a special edging. And sometimes it’s the where and how of the steek. Steek crochet for the easy chic of it.

    I love this conference prep blogging because it makes me aware of things that I’ve done for years, like collect pattern schematics.

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    • June 24th, 2016 by Vashti Braha

    Reinforced Steeked Crochet Hole, Two Examples


    Reinforcing a Steeked Crochet Hole

    There’s more than one way to reinforce a cut made into crochet stitches because there’s more than one kind of steek and use for that steek. Here are just two kinds of projects made in the same stitch pattern.

    Both of these projects are part of the Mesmer Tunisian Veils pattern. If you steek crochet stitches the easy way—within one row—you have at minimum two yarn ends to fasten securely and then weave in. Some Tunisian stitches will cause you to have more (see newsletter #79 about that).

    The more stitches you unravel, the larger the hole and the longer the yarn ends will be. I only unraveled 3 of the pink stitches and that left me with yarn ends that were just long enough to work with comfortably.

    If the steeked crochet hole won’t be getting a lot of direct wear and tear, use those yarn ends to reinforce the stitch at each end of the slit. Look closely at the pink photos where I weaved the fine mohair yarn in and around the stitch at each end. This will get light wear. It’s a “keyhole” opening for a scarf.

    Steeked Crochet Hole for Sleeves

    You’re looking at an edged armhole in the brown example. An armhole needs more reinforcement because of the constant pressure it supports in a garment. I switched to a double-ended circular crochet hook to crochet a few rounds of the same Tunisian stitch. It gives a really nice cap sleeve look when it’s worn. In the future I’d love to try longer sleeves this way.

    This is part of my blogging goal of 50 posts for these 50 days of epic crochet conference prep. I’ve missed a day here and there lately because my dear friend from college is here for the week! We’re about to leave for the day to see the mermaids of Weeki Watchee. It’s a spring fed lake and water park.

     

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    • June 15th, 2016 by Vashti Braha

    Steeking Crochet Newsletter Overflow


    Three images that didn’t make it into the newsletter I sent out yesterday on steeking crochet:

    Not sure if it’s obvious in the middle photo: I removed two stitches in the forward pass. It freed up the return pass AND the stitches above them in the next row. This is because these stitches are crocheted around the post of the stitches, not into a base (i.e. into any return pass loops).

    Without a lifeline, these post stitches just dissolve into messy loops. It’s not as bad as Tks or Tfs (as mentioned in the newsletter). The unraveling is contained.

    My friend arrived last night from Kentucky! So glad I got the newsletter sent off. I hope you enjoyed my exploration of steeking crochet. My next critical conference prep task is to complete my last class handout (Starwirbel Way). After that milestone, I’ll add corrections to all handouts as I receive them from my editor, and direct my mental energies toward writing patterns.

     

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    • June 12th, 2016 by Vashti Braha

    Steeked Crochet Scarf: First Look


    First Photos of Today’s Steeked Crochet Scarf

    This afternoon I added four small steeks (cut holes) in a wide Tunisian lace scarf. I’ve had this scarf for years. It’s an old oversized swatch, really. It gave rise to the Mesmer Tunisian Veils pattern and to the Maze Vest that is published in the summer 2014 issue of Interweave Crochet Magazine.

    (If these photos look shadowy, it’s because I took them during Tropical Storm Colin today.)

    Steeked crochet scarf: 4-keyhole Tunisian Mesmer

    Four looks for the Four-Keyhole Steeked Tunisian Net.

    One of my goals has been to create a “keyhole” (steeked) crochet scarf for my July Steeking Tunisian class. A keyhole scarf is just one of many things a steek can offer.

    Instead of crocheting a new one from scratch, I thought of this sequined pink rectangle. It has always been dear to my heart, even though it’s just a bit too small. (The only reason it’s too small is that I was trying to conserve the expensive yarn! I didn’t know then that this Tunisian net stitch uses less yarn than usual.)

    Not only does adding a “keyhole” (a steeked slit) make it easy to wear now, it can be styled so many ways.

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    This is Day 18 out of the 50 conference prep days I have until the big event. I can cross this project off my list! I’ve been wanting to turn my pink Mesmer into a steeked crochet scarf for months.

    Today is also the day that Tropical Storm Colin arrived, and I’m happy to report that we’ve gotten off easy with this one (so far). The worst is supposed to be behind us and it has been no big deal. My son did have to miss school today–we couldn’t get onto the mainland. The flooding is minor compared to what it could be, and the wind and rain have been milder than predicted. No power outages so far. We haven’t had to move our car to higher land.

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    • June 6th, 2016 by Vashti Braha


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