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Shaped Star Stitch Class Swatch

Happy Memorial Day.

It’s a short update today. Checkout this pretty photo I took this morning of a brand-new star stitch class swatch. This is what the Starwirbel Cowl stitch pattern looks like when it’s done in flat spiraling rounds. (It still has the scrap yarn marking the spiraling rounds.) I’m testing the shaping information in the Starwirbel Way class handout.

Thank you.

Thanks for joining me as I blog the 50 days of preparation for the crochet conference this summer! It’s Day 11 which means I’ve blogged one-fifth of the 50 days.

Have I completed one-fifth of my tasks? Frankly, I don’t know. There are so many little things to do that they’re hard to count accurately. If my gut says I’m moving through things at a good pace, I’ve learned I can trust that and enjoy the constant river of details that get done as they flow through me. I’m halfway through my list of things to do for the Starwirbel star stitch class.

It was my gut that said, “For the 2016 conference you’ll have from half to two-thirds of 2015’s river of show booth details to manage. After several years of teaching you’ll have slightly less than half of a river of teaching details, so GO FOR IT! DO BOTH!”

Here’s a different view of the swatch:

Star Stitch Class Swatch: Shaping a Spiral
Would you believe the yarn I used is white?
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Star Stitch Crochet Class Resources

“A Star Stitch For Every Purpose” is a sold out three-hour crochet class that I taught in July, 2014 at the 20th anniversary annual conference for the national crochet guild (CGOA). I researched over 200 sources from the 1840’s to the present. Class materials included a spiral-bound booklet of Star stitch patterns and a step by step how-to section.

Click on an image in the gallery below to learn more about it. Scroll past this gallery for more resources.

Please visit:

The earliest example of Star stitches I’ve found so far is in an 1881 issue of a Norwegian magazine. It’s remarkable to me how seldom Star stitches have appeared in crochet books since 1881! 

 Key historical sources:

  • 1881: Nordisk Mønster-Tidende.
  • 1886: Knitting and Crochet.
  • 1891: The Art of Crocheting, by Butterick.
  • 1891: Home Work, by A. M. (Toronto).
  • Late 1800’s: Weldons Practical Crochet, First Series (London).
  • 1910: Fleisher’s Book #8.

When Star stitches do appear in a book or online, they can vary in many ways both subtle and dramatic. This is mainly because a Star stitch is a compound stitch, so there are opportunities to vary each step along the way. This is true not only when completing each Star, but also when crocheting the next row into it, and what stitches are in that next row. For example, you can crochet Stars into Stars – with turning or without. You can alternate a row of Stars with a row of, say, single crochet stitches. All of these simple choices change the look of the stitch, and the experience of crocheting them.

I’ve been unable to locate a print copy of two Japanese “Star Crochet” books, but here is the ISBN for one of the volumes: 978-4-579-11323-1.

For more Star stitch images as I create them, bookmark/follow this Star Stitches photo album in Flickr.

 

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Rosebud Argyle Color Pooling Stitch

Moss Stitch (linen, granite, seed stitch) modified for longer crochet thread color sequences.
Size 10 variegated Lizbeth cotton thread, color #10-104 Spring Garden. I created a “Color Eater” variation of the moss stitch for it. Row by row pattern below.
View hi-res size.

 

Have you seen the planned color pooling crocheters are doing to get a cool argyle or plaid look with variegated afghan yarns? You can use lots of different stitches for this, but the height of single crochets (sc, or in UK/AUS: dc) is great, especially with moss stitch (a.k.a. linen, granite, seed stitch).

Planned Pooling with Cotton Thread

I pooled the colors of a size 10 crochet thread into an argyle and “Rosebud Argyle” is the result. It’s 3.5″ x 3.5″ and dense because I used a color-gobbling stitch pattern, so I added a border and turned it into a “mug mat” (coaster). I’ll be bringing it to the Creative Planned Color Pooling class.

If I had used the classic moss stitch pattern of [sc in next ch-space, skip next sc, ch 1], my swatch would have come out more than double that size: over 7″ x 7″ (I ripped it out before measuring exactly how much smaller it is with my stitch variation).

Even the 3.5″ size is bigger than I expected! My original goal was only 1″ or 2″. New lesson learned: the color changes in variegated thread look short until you start crocheting with it. The stitches just don’t take up much thread.

Stitches Change the Color Width

I really wanted the experience (and general look) of a moss stitch pooled argyle, so I needed to substitute with stitches that eat up a lot more thread. Why? The length of each color in a variegated thread or yarn is fixed. When the colors repeat, their sequence is also fixed. The total length of one whole sequence is your fixed width. The way you alter this fixed width is with the stitches you use. (There are other options but not for this post.)

Each row of moss stitch is [sc in next chain-space, skip next sc, ch 1]. With each new row, the sc’s are over the ch’s and the ch’s are over the sc’s. It is common to use half double crochets (hdc, or UK/AUS: htr) instead of sc. I haven’t seen much of it lately, though. I hope crocheters are feeling free to alter the moss stitch, especially if you’re doing planned pooling.

Below I’ve written up the stitch pattern instructions for my color-gobbling moss stitch variation. It’s the one I used for the swatch pictured above. I wrote it as if you’re using a solid colored yarn or thread.

Vashti’s “Color Eater Stitch”

Pattern Notes

  1. The “color eater stitch” is [slip stitch, 2-hdc puff] in the next ch-space. The slip stitch is to keep the hdc puff closer to the height of a sc and puffy (rosebud-like). It also helps keep the color changes distinct when you’re pooling.
  2. Like moss stitch, each row is [color-eating sc substitute in next ch-space, skip next color-eating sc substitute, ch 1]. With each new row, the color eaters are over the ch’s and the ch’s are over the color eaters.
  3. It’s easy to fine tune how much you use of a color when you’re pooling with it. For example, sometimes I did a 3-hdc puff instead of 2 to eat up more color. Or, a tighter ch-1 and shorter puff to eat less color. I got better at this with the later rows. Maybe you can tell in the swatch.
  4. When color pooling with it, do whatever you need to at the row ends: just a ss and hdc to use less color, or even a 4-hdc puff to use much more.

Abbreviations

  • ch – chain stitch
  • hdc – half double crochet (hdc, or UK/AUS: htr)
  • 2-hdc puff – [yarn over, pull up a loop] twice in the same designated stitch, yarn over and pull loop through all 5 loops on hook.
  • ss – slip stitch

How to Crochet It

Foundation chain: With a solid colored thread or yarn for your first swatch, chain an even number.

Row 1: Skip 3 chs, *[ss, 2-hdc puff] in next ch, ch 1, skip next ch, repeat from * until one ch remains, [ss, 2-hdc puff] in last ch, ch 2, turn.

Row 2: Skip first puff and ss, *[ss, 2-hdc puff] in next ch-space, ch 1, skip next puff and ss, repeat from * for rest of row, [ss, 2-hdc puff] in space of turning-ch 2, turn.

Repeat Row 2 for pattern.

For more on planned pooling, you might like this recent blog post: Color Pooling Developments.
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Foundation Star Stitches Step by Step

How to Crochet the Foundation Star Stitch in 14 Steps
View the full size hi-res image.

Star Stitch Foundation

It’s the perfect way to start a Starwirbel! We’re going to use it in the upcoming Starwirbel Way class this July. (CGOA Chain Link conference this July in Portland, Oregon).

For this unusual stitch, two foundation chains must be created as you complete each star. In the text instructions below, a [bracketed number] refers to a numbered photo step above.

First foundation star stitch (fstar):

Chain 3 loosely.

  • [image #1] Pull up a loop in each of the second and third chains; you have 3 loops on your hook.
  • [image 2] Chain 1 (counts as first foundation chain of first star),
  • [3] Yarn over and pull up a loop in the two outermost strands of the chain just made,
  • [4] Chain 1 (counts as second foundation chain of first star),
  • [5] Pinch it while you yarn over and pull through all 5 loops on your hook so that the last loop doesn’t tighten,
  • [6] Chain 1 (eye of this first fstar).

Tips: Pinching also helps you recognize which loops are the new foundation chain loops. Pull up loops loosely enough that a second crochet hook could fit in them.

Add more foundation star stitches:

Vashti's lacy Star Stitch Foundation in a hand dyed mohair for the "Firewirbel" Starwirbel Cowl.*Pull up a loop in each of these places:

  • [7] The Eye,
  • [8] Side of star,
  • [9] Two loops of second foundation chain of star;
  • [10] Chain 1 (counts as first foundation chain of next star),
  • [11] Yarn over and pull up loop in chain just made,
  • [12] Chain 1 (counts as second foundation chain of next star) and pinch it,
  • [13] Yarn over and pull through all 6 loops on hook,
  • [14] Chain 1 for eye.

Repeat from * for each new fstar.

You might be interested in the resources page for the Starwirbel Way class.
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Creative Planned Pooling: Class Resources

Creative Planned Color Pooling Crochet Class 2018 Vashti Braha
Updated on 4/16/18. View the above image full size. This is a conveniently clickable group of things I mention and display in Creative Planned Color Pooling classes. I teach the next one on July 28, 2018 in Portland ORThis page will likely be updated again before class time and possibly after.     — Vashti Braha

 

? Thinking of signing up for this class? My Color Pooling Developments blog post was written with you in mind.

Crochet Patterns & Crochet Alongs

  • Jempool pattern. It’s the blue scarf on the left in the above photo.
  • Crochet AlongThe Jempool CAL (a source of some great info!)
  • See all of Vashti’s color pooling projects and swatches at this self-updating Ravelry link (log in to Ravelry first to see all of them).
  • Crochet to the Color Playbook pattern set. (This is a freeform “stitch pooling” way to modify accidental pooling, rather than doing planned pooling.)

Recommended Issues of Vashti’s Crochet Inspirations Newsletter

Pooling Classes, Blogged

Photo Albums & Inspiration Boards

Any Books on Planned Pooling with Crochet?

  • Found one! Yarn Pooling Made Easy by Marly Bird. Published by Leisure Arts, 2017.

Color Pooling Crocheters and Knitters

  • Pooled Knits Ravelry group
  • Planned pooling crochet patterns: Ravelry doesn’t seem to have a category for this technique yet, so I used the keyword “pooling”. Of 23 search results it looks like 20 are true planned pooling. Of these, 17 are argyles, and most appear to be seed stitch (as of 4/16/18). This is a self-updating link.
  • Planned pooling knitting patterns: as with the crochet search link above, I used a keyword search and the link is self updating. Of the 91 results (as of 4/16/18), about 80 are true planned pooling designs.
  • Karla Stuebing’s 2013 article, “Art and Science of Planned Pooling.” It’s about knitting but very inspiring for crochet.
  • I expect to add more articles and blog posts written by others as I finish updating the July 2018 class handout. Between 2016 and now, planned pooling has become a popular technique!